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Easy Brunch Recipe: Roasted Chiles and Vegetable Frittata

Oh my, I can’t believe it’s been so long since I last posted here. So sorry to have abandoned you so just wanted to let you all know that I’m still here! 🙂 I’ve just been so overwhelmed with work, home repairs, travel and wait for it……redesigning this blog!! Woo Hoo! Within a few weeks I’ll be able to share with you a brand spanking new Hot Lollies blog that’s bright and lively with great new spicy content to go along with it. I’ll still keep posting here until I make the switch over to the new design so please don’t go anywhere! You see, I even made a roasted chiles and vegetable frittata for you! How can you resist a spicy, hearty frittata?

baked-frittata

I saw this episode of Ina Garten’s Barefoot Contessa a while ago and immediately went online to bookmark this frittata recipe. I love Ina’s recipes. She makes the most luscious comfort foods look so easy to make. I don’t always get a chance to watch her show but this episode featured all the things to make with cheese so clearly I had to drop everything!

Ina made a bacon and Gruyere grilled cheese, a rib-eye steak with Stilton cheese sauce, a coconut cupcake with cream cheese frosting but what really hooked me was a roasted vegetable frittata. Tender pieces of lightly season roasted vegetables tossed with an egg and cheese mixture and baked to perfection! It’s a great way to start your Sunday morning with a bright and peppery egg dish. The chile peppers add nice heat that isn’t overwhelming and really lets the vegetable and cheese flavors come through.

I spiced up the recipe and also substituted a few things to make it just a little healthier. I switched the half & half for 2% milk and cut back on the oil by just drizzling a small amount to roast the vegetables. The original recipe also served twelve so I quartered the recipe and made them in ramekins instead of a cast iron skillet, you know, for portion control. 😉

egg-mix

frittata

Roasted Chiles Vegetables and Frittata
serves 2

recipe adapted from Ina Garten

1/2 small zucchini, 1 inch dice
1/4 red pepper, 1 inch dice
1/4 green pepper, 1 inch dice
1/4 red onion, diced
1/2 small cubanelle pepper
1/2 jalapeno, diced
habanero-infused olive oil
1 small garlic clove, minced
4 eggs
1/4 cup milk
1-2 tbsp fresh Parmesean cheese, grated
1 scallion, chopped
2-3 slices of habanero pepper, diced
2 tbsp Gruyere cheese
1 tbsp butter
salt & pepper

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees, spread zucchini, peppers (except habanero) and onion on baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt & pepper and toss around until nicely coated. Heat for 10 minutes then add the garlic and toss again. Heat for another 10-15 minutes. Remove from oven.

2. Turn down oven temperature to 350 degrees. In a bowl, beat the eggs, add the milk and beat again. Stir in the Parmesean cheese, season with salt and pepper and mix well.

3. Melt butter in a saute pan, add the scallions, habanero pepper and cook until soft. Add the roasted vegetables and mix well.

4. Spoon the roasted vegetables into two ramekins until each is 3/4 full and top off with the egg mixture. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes then top each with the Gruyere cheese and baked for a couple of minutes until cheese is melted.

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Lollipop Stirrers: Another Way To Enjoy Your Tea

How do you enjoy your favorite tea? A little honey, sugar, agave syrup? Well here’s a treat that will sweeten your tea and add a bit of chile spice: use spicy lollipop as stirrers! These are perfect for when you feel the sniffles coming on or to soothe a sore throat, the chilies in the lollipops will warm you up and will also help with your cough and congestion. Mmm, I’m feeling better already!!

Try the ginger spice lollipop, the mango habanero or the coconut chile.

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Wordless Wednesday: A Hump Day Habanero Mojito Fix

Habanero Mojito

Habanero Mint Mojito – muddle mint, sugar, lime wedges, habanero slices, add ice, white rum, seltzer and sip.

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Get to know your hot chili peppers…

Ever walked by a gorgeous display of peppers at your local farmers market or grocery store and wonder, “hmm those look great but not sure what to do with them” or just quickly move pass them? No worries, you don’t have to like spicy foods to enjoy the flavors in hot peppers. Some of the hottest peppers in the world have a sweetness to them…ahem, if you get rid of the spicy stuff inside. Hot chili peppers pack an incredible amount of flavor and knowing your peppers and picking the mild from the hot, and the hot from the hellfire will help you enjoy the peppers that your palate can handle.

There are so many varieties of peppers so I thought it would be a great idea to identify a few of them for you. I hope you will find it useful.

Here they are listed from mildest to hottest…

Ancho (dried Poblano): Very mild, large chili. Can measure 3 inches across and up to 6 inches long which makes them great for stuffing.

Green Chili Pepper: Also a mild chili pepper used in a variety of Mexican dishes and similar in heat to the Poblano. These are large and green and turn red when ripe, although heat is still the same. These look similar to the Anaheim peppers and would be great for pickling.

Guajillo (dried Mirasol Chili): This mild chili can be stemmed/seeded, ground up in a coffee grinder and used as a smoky chili powder. Also great for making sauces and dry rubs.

Jalapeno: Probably one of the most ubiquitous of all peppers. The dried version is called a Chipotle pepper. These range from mild to hot. Hotter than a Poblano but much milder than a Cayenne. Great in sauces, toppings, infusing in liquors, really endless uses.

Arbol (or De Arbol): Very similar in heat to the Cayenne pepper and Pequin pepper. They’re called “de Arbol” which is Spanish for “tree like” because stems look like trees and flavor is earthy and woody.

Thai Chili: Very hot chili used in Thai cooking. I sometimes crumble the dried chilies and sprinkle in soups or chili when I want pure heat but not much flavor. The fresh versions are used in fish sauces, Thai curries and a variety of other Asian dishes. There are other regions of the world that also have similar peppers.

Habanero: Very hot peppers with a distinct sweet flavor. Very similar in flavor and heat to the Scotch Bonnet pepper. You should wear gloves when handling these or wash your hands immediately after. Can be used in sauces, curries (Asian & Caribbean), sweets, pretty much anything. These are my all time favorites.

Bhut Jolokia (aka Naga Jolokia or Ghost Pepper): This was considered one of the hottest peppers in the world up until March of this year when the Trinidad Scorpion Butch knocked it out in the Guinness World Records. However, the last I read on this, the Chile Pepper Institute (yes there is one!!) hasn’t recognized this claim yet so technically the Ghost pepper is still on top. This pepper is extremely hot, up to 4 times hotter than the Habanero! Caution when handling and using as too much will burn for hours!! Just check on YouTube if you don’t believe. In saying that, I’ve tried it (very little) and flavor is similar to the Habanero/Scotch Bonnet just more blazing hot!!

So now what? Well, you know a bit more but how do you use them? Well that’s why I’m here, I plan to create easy to make dishes using each of these peppers but in the meantime, here’s a simple recipe:

Jalapeno infused Vodka

  1. Pour 1/2 liter of good Vodka (Tequila works as well) into a glass pitcher.
  2. Stem a jalapeno and cut lengthwise and drop 1/2 of jalapeno into vodka.
  3. Let vodka sit (no need to refrigerate) for at least 6 hrs or overnight. The longer it sits the spicier your vodka. Strain vodka when ready to use…you don’t want seeds in your drink!
  4. Place in freezer to get it nice and cold and enjoy neat or on the rocks.

Before the holidays are over I’ll share a few drink recipes I make with this spicy vodka.

Again, if you don’t like the heat in any recipe, you can easily remove the insides and enjoy the great flavor of chili peppers!

FYI:  The heat of a pepper (levels of capsaicin) is measured on the Scoville Scale. The scale indicates how hot a pepper is based on it’s Scoville Heat Unit (SHU). The lower the SHU the milder the pepper. For example a bell pepper has zero SHU, a jalapeno has between 3,500-8,000 SHU and Habanero about 200,000-350,000 SHU….get the picture? If you really want more details on these ratings and the ratings of other peppers check out this great diagram at the Eat More Chiles site.

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